Controlling the properties of graphene transistors with pressure

An international team of researchers claims to have developed a technique to manipulate the electrical conductivity of graphene with compression, bringing the material closer to being a viable semiconductor for use in electronic devices.

“Graphene is the best electrical conductor that we know of on Earth,” said Matthew Yankowitz, a postdoctoral research scientist in Columbia University’s physics department. “The problem is that it's too good at conducting electricity, and we don’t know how to stop it effectively.

“Our work establishes for the first time a route to realising a technologically relevant band gap in graphene without compromising its quality. Additionally, if applied to other interesting combinations of 2D materials, the technique we used may lead to new emergent phenomena, such as magnetism, superconductivity, and more.”

Turning off the transmission of electrons through graphene without altering or sacrificing its favourable qualities has proven unsuccessful to date.

One superstructure does show promise, however. When graphene is sandwiched between layers of boron nitride (BN), an atomically-thin electrical insulator, and the two materials are rotationally aligned, the BN has been shown to modify the electronic structure of the graphene, creating a band gap that allows the material to behave as a semiconductor. The band gap created by this layering alone, however, is not large enough to be useful in the operation of electrical transistor devices at room temperature.

To enhance this band gap, Yankowitz, and his colleagues at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, the University of Seoul in Korea, and the National University of Singapore, compressed the layers of the BN-graphene structure and found that applying pressure substantially increased the size of the band gap, more effectively blocking the flow of electricity through the graphene.

“As we squeeze and apply pressure, the band gap grows,” explained Yankowitz. “It's still not a big enough gap – a strong enough switch – to be used in transistor devices at room temperature, but we have gained a fundamentally better understanding of why this band gap exists in the first place, how it can be tuned, and how we may target it in the future. Transistors are ubiquitous in our modern electronic devices, so if we can find a way to use graphene as a transistor it would have widespread applications.”

Yankowitz added that scientists have been conducting experiments at high pressures in conventional three-dimensional materials for years, but no one had yet figured out a way to do them with 2D materials. Now, researchers will be able to test how applying various degrees of pressure changes the properties of a vast range of combinations of stacked 2D materials.

“Any emergent property that results from the combination of 2D materials should grow stronger as the materials are compressed,” Yankowitz said. “We can take any of these arbitrary structures now and squeeze them and the strength of the resulting effect is tuneable. We've added a new experimental tool to the toolbox we use to manipulate 2D materials and that tool opens boundless possibilities for creating devices with designer properties.”

Author
Tom Austin-Morgan

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