Engineering Materials News

The latest news from the global materials community including material science, engineering, breakthroughs, innovation and applications.

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13/12/2017

CPI and Durham University collaborate to commercialise nanotechnology-enabled products

The Centre for Process Innovation (CPI) and Durham University are working together to help SMEs in County Durham to accelerate the commercialisation of nanomaterial-enhanced products, supported with funds from the European Regional Development Fund.   Read More

01/12/2017

Merging molecular science and engineering to make 3D printing better, cheaper

Researchers at Imperial College London are merging the fundamental research of molecular science with the more end-of-use-focussed discipline of engineering to help propel the 3D printing industry into its next stage of development.  Read More

27/11/2017

Graphene vibration could unlock clean, limitless energy

Research conducted by physicists at the University of Arkansas, has provided strong evidence that the motion of two-dimensional materials could be used as a source of clean, limitless energy. Paul Thibado, professor of physics at the University of Arkansas, and his students studied the movements of graphene.  Read More

22/11/2017

Melting hurts rather than helps sprayed metal coatings to stick

When bonding two pieces of metal, either the metals must melt where they meet or some molten metal must be introduced between the pieces. A solid bond then forms when the metal solidifies again. But researchers at MIT have found that in some situations, melting can actually inhibit metal bonding rather than promote it.  Read More

17/11/2017

Bonding composite to metal with no adhesives

Working on the Ariel Hipercar project, Powdertech Surface Science has developed a process, that uses no adhesives, for bonding polypropylene glass fibre composite to aluminium for the vehicle’s monocoque chassis.  Read More

15/11/2017

Helium-resistant material could enable stable nuclear fusion

Engineers and researchers from Texas A&M University and the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico have found a way to prevent helium, a by-product of the fusion reaction, from weakening nuclear fusion reactors.  Read More

06/11/2017

Tungsten to replace lead

EU Directive 2011/65/EU (RoHS 2) regulates the use of certain hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment, with lead ranked at the top of the list, higher than mercury and cadmium. It means lead is highly toxic and does not break down easily, which is why a weight proportion of only 0.1% is permitted in new electronic and electric equipment. It also has a melting point of 327°C, constituting an additional hazard in case of fire.   Read More

02/11/2017

Breakthrough for crack propagation in glass

Researchers have long pondered the origin of delicate crisscross faceted patterns that are commonly found on the surfaces of broken material. Typical crack speeds in glass easily surpass a kilometre per second, and broken surface features may be smaller than a millimetre. Since the formation of surface structure lasts a tiny fraction of a second, the processes generating these patterns have been largely a mystery.  Read More

30/10/2017

The Engineering Design Shows a big hit with visitors and exhibitors

The Engineering Design Shows 2017 drew to a close on Thursday 20th October with positive feedback from exhibitors and visitors.Running from 19 – 20 October at the Ricoh Arena, Coventry, the shows brought together more than 4000 design engineering professionals to the showcase of British design innovation.  Read More

25/10/2017

Concrete filled with irradiated plastic cuts carbon emissions

MIT researchers have added tiny plastic particulates to concrete and found the resulting compound is 20% stronger and requires less energy overall to produce, reducing carbon emissions. Plastic flakes were exposed to small, harmless doses of gamma radiation and then pulverised into flakes and made into a fine powder, which was then mixed with a cement paste.  Read More

17/10/2017

Engineering Design Show 2017 opens tomorrow

UK design engineers will be gathering at the Ricoh Arena for this year’s Engineering Design Show on 18-19 October to learn about the latest innovations and trends shaping this fast-moving design sector.   Read More

02/10/2017

10-point guide for planning your visit to the Engineering Design Show 2017

The Engineering Design Show (EDS) is the UK's must-attend event for engineering, electronics and embedded design. It promises a fully immersive experience of innovation, inspiration, interaction and insight for all visitors, taking place from 18 - 19 October, at the Ricoh Arena, Coventry.   Read More

25/09/2017

Scientists use computation to design a super-light crystalline aluminium

Aluminium is already highly prized for its conductivity, low melting point, strength when alloyed, imperviousness to rust and, above all, it’s extremely light weight. Now, researchers from Utah State University and Southern Federal University in Rostov-on Don, Russia have used computational design to conceive a form of crystalline aluminium with an even lower density than standard aluminium.  Read More

14/09/2017

Engineering Materials Live opens next week at Duxford

Engineering Materials Live opens its doors to visitors next Thursday (21st September) at the Imperial War Museum, Duxford in Cambridgeshire, and you can still secure your free visitor badge online to attend.   Read More

13/09/2017

Hexcel launches £7.4m project to create carbon fibre fabrics for aircraft and automotive parts

Hexcel is launching a four-year Multi AXial Infused Materials (MAXIM) project, a Government-backed £7.4 million research and development project. The MAXIM project, backed by the UK Aerospace Technology Institute and match-funded by the Department for Business Energy and Industrial Strategy, will be responsible for developing progressive, cost-effective materials and manufacturing solutions for large aerospace and automotive composite structures such as aircraft wings and car bodies.  Read More

12/09/2017

Self-assembling nanoparticles can switch between a mirror and a window

Researchers from the Department of chemistry at Imperial College, London, have made a filter that can change between a mirror and a window by finely tuning the distance between nanoparticles in a single layer.   Read More

08/09/2017

British Engineering Excellence Awards 2017 shortlist unveiled

MA Business, publisher of New Electronics and Eureka magazines, is delighted to announce the shortlist for this year’s British Engineering Excellence Awards (BEEAs).  Read More

08/09/2017

JLR makes closed-loop aluminium recycling in its cars a REALITY

Jaguar Land Rover (JLR) Automotive is expanding the use of recycled aluminium in its car bodies to cut waste and reduce carbon emissions. The £2 million project, called REALITY, has found a way to enable the closed-loop recycling of aluminium from end-of-life vehicles back into high-performance product forms for new vehicle bodies manufactured in the UK by JLR.  Read More

05/09/2017

Decluttering space

Hundreds of millions of pieces of space junk orbit the Earth daily, from chips of rocket paint, to entire dead satellites. This cloud of high-tech detritus circles the planet at 17,500mph. At these speeds, even objects as small as a pebble can severely damage a passing spacecraft.  Read More

05/09/2017

Protective lubrication

Tata Steel has launched Prime Lubrication Treatment (PLT) which, when applied in a thin coating along with the conventional oil layer, is said to provide a superior lubrication system that improves processing of hot-dip galvanised GI steels for exposed automotive panels.  Read More

29/08/2017

Engineering Materials Live returns at Duxford

After the success of the inaugural Engineering Materials Live Exhibition, co-located with FAST Exhibition, at the National Motorcycle Museum in May, the event is back again at the Imperial War Museum, Duxford in Cambridgeshire on 21st September.  Read More

23/08/2017

Shaping the future of magnesium car parts

Magnesium is 75% lighter than steel, 33% lighter than aluminium and is the fourth most common element on earth behind iron, silicon and oxygen. But despite this, manufacturers have been hindered in their attempts to incorporate magnesium alloys into structural car parts. To provide the necessary strength has required the addition of costly rare elements such as dysprosium, praseodymium and ytterbium – until now.  Read More

15/08/2017

Nanomaterials help spiders spin tougher silk

Italian and UK researchers have found a way to make Spider silk stronger, using various spider species and carbon nanotubes or graphene.  Read More

10/08/2017

Optical method to pinpoint weak spots in jet engine thermal coatings

For the first time, researchers from Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, have demonstrated that an optical analysis method can reveal weak areas in ceramic thermal barrier coatings that protect jet engine turbines from high temperatures and wear. The technique could be used to predict how long coatings would last on an airplane and might eventually lead to new thermal barrier coatings, making engines more efficient and cutting both the cost and pollution of air travel.   Read More

04/08/2017

Rail Institute calls for lighter weight bogies

An ambitious plan to double the amount of European freight carried by rail could depend on the development of lighter-weight bogies produced using stronger steels and innovative manufacturing techniques, according to findings by experts at the University of Huddersfield.   Read More

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