Composite Materials News

The latest news from the composites industry including new material science, engineering breakthroughs, processing, production and manufacture.

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02/10/2018

New materials could make future vehicles more comfortable

Scientists from Surrey joined forces with Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and the University of California to develop a material that has high stiffness and damping. The material, that is as stiff as metal but flexible enough to withstand strong vibrations, could transform the car manufacturing industry, the scientists say.  Read More

17/09/2018

Discussing the use of AI to design advanced materials at Engineering Materials Live

Using artificial intelligence (AI) and harnessing the power of deep learning to guide the design of new advanced materials, is the topic of a speaker paper that will be delivered at Engineering Materials Live later this week, by Cambridge-based company Intellegens.  Read More

03/09/2018

Material shifts shape using heat and light

A material developed by engineers at the University of Colorado Boulder can transform into complex, pre-programmed shapes via light and temperature stimuli before reverting to its original form.  Read More

29/08/2018

Tufnol Composites to return to Engineering Materials Live

Tufnol Composites is returning to the Engineering Materials Live show following success at the exhibition in 2017.  Read More

12/07/2018

Graphene smart membranes can control water

Researchers at The University of Manchester’s National Graphene Institute (NGI) have successfully controlled water flow by sending an electrical current through graphene oxide membranes. The membranes can even be used to completely block water from passing through when required. This research is claimed to open an avenue for developing smart membrane technologies and could revolutionise the field of artificial biological systems, tissue engineering and filtration.  Read More

28/06/2018

‘Stealth’ material hides hot objects from infrared sensors

Infrared cameras are the heat-sensing eyes that help drones find their targets even in the dead of night or through heavy fog. Now, thanks to researchers from the University of Wisconsin–Madison, hiding from such detectors could become much easier, thanks to a new cloaking material that renders objects — and people — practically invisible.  Read More

27/06/2018

This material’s properties could enable better IR detection for autonomous vehicles

One of the leading challenges for autonomous vehicles is to ensure that they can detect and sense objects – even through dense fog. Compared to the current visible light-based cameras, infrared (IR) cameras can offer better visibility through the fog, smoke or tiny particles that can scatter the visible light.   Read More

25/06/2018

First partners announced by Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre

The University of Manchester’s recently completed £60m Graphene Engineering Innovation Centre (GEIC) has agreed the first in a series of industrial partnerships to accelerate the commercialisation of graphene in Manchester.  Read More

22/05/2018

Processing glass like a polymer

Pure quartz glass is highly transparent and resistant to thermal, physical, and chemical impacts. These are optimum prerequisites for use in optics, data technology or medical engineering. For efficient, high-quality machining, however, adequate processes are lacking. Scientists from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) say they have developed a forming technology to structure quartz glass like a polymer.   Read More

21/05/2018

Controlling the properties of graphene transistors with pressure

An international team of researchers claims to have developed a technique to manipulate the electrical conductivity of graphene with compression, bringing the material closer to being a viable semiconductor for use in electronic devices.  Read More

18/05/2018

Manmade bio-material outperforms steel and spider silk

A team, led by Daniel Söderberg from the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, claims to have used DESY’s (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron) X-ray light source PETRA III to produce the strongest bio-material ever made. The artificial and bio-degradable cellulose fibres (CNF) are stronger than steel and even spider silk, which is usually considered the strongest bio-based material.  Read More

03/05/2018

CPI and NCC collaborate to develop future lightweight materials

The Centre for Process Innovation (CPI) is collaborating with the National Composites Centre (NCC) to develop the next generation of lightweight materials. The project, known as ‘Enhanced structural composites’ (ECOi), is evaluating the functionality and applicability of new graphene-enhanced materials in a variety of industries.  Read More

19/04/2018

Adaptive materials for advanced rotorcraft concepts

Engineers at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and the University of Maryland have developed a technique that causes a composite material to become 93% stiffer and 35% stronger on-demand when exposed to ultraviolet light.  Read More

18/04/2018

Scalable manufacturing process spools out strips of graphene membranes

Engineers from MIT have developed a continuous manufacturing process that produces long strips of high-quality graphene for applications in desalination, biological separation and more.  Read More

12/04/2018

Metamaterial redirects and reflects sound

Researchers at Duke University in the US have demonstrated the design and construction of what they claim is the first thin material that can control the redirection and reflection of sound waves with almost perfect efficiency.  Read More

11/04/2018

Stratasys adds PEKK-based, high-performance thermoplastic for FDM process

At MACH 2018 Stratasys introduced a new PEKK-based high-performance thermoplastic, called Antero 800NA for its FDM process for space, aerospace, automotive, high-end industrial manufacturing, and oil-and-gas applications.  Read More

23/03/2018

3D printed metallic glass alloys

North Carolina State University researchers have created amorphous metal, or metallic glass, alloys using 3D printing technology. This, the researchers say, opens the door to a variety of applications, such as more efficient electric motors, better wear-resistant materials, higher strength materials, and lighter weight structures.  Read More

12/03/2018

Conductive coating could unlock future biometric and wearable technology

A team of researchers from the College of Engineering at Texas A&M University has developed a mechanically robust conductive coating that it claims can maintain performance under heavy stretching and bending.   Read More

12/03/2018

New ceramic coating enables wider adoption of composite materials

Zircotec Group has developed the first plasma applied thermal barrier coating that can be used with composites that require a Class A display surface. The new technology allows vehicle manufactures to use the lightweight materials in places that have previously not been possible, such as aerodynamic aids near exhaust pipes or the exhaust shrouds themselves.  Read More

27/02/2018

MIT technology produces electricity from temperature fluctuations

A team of researchers from MIT has come up with a novel way to convert temperature fluctuations into electrical power. Instead of requiring two different temperature inputs at the same time, this ‘thermal resonator’ system takes advantage of the swings in ambient temperature that occur during the day-night cycle.  Read More

29/01/2018

Self-repairing ceramic for aircraft engines

Japanese researchers claim to have developed a ceramic material that self-repairs cracks in just one minute and could drastically change manufacturing methods for the transportation industry.  Read More

24/01/2018

Light-bending material could be used to create an invisibility cloak

Researchers from Northwestern University in Illinois have developed a first-of-its-kind technique for creating entirely new classes of optical materials and devices that could lead to light bending and cloaking devices.  Read More

16/01/2018

High-performance composites made via novel 3D printing technique

A team of researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) has demonstrated a novel 3D printing method that yields unprecedented control of the arrangement of short fibres embedded in polymer matrices. They used this additive manufacturing technique to program fibre orientation within epoxy composites in specified locations, enabling the creation of structural materials that are optimised for strength, stiffness, and damage tolerance.  Read More

11/01/2018

Research into self-regenerative materials

A consortium of seven universities, has received a grant of £2.7m to undertake ground-breaking research into manufacturing materials which have the ability to self-heal or regenerate.  Read More

08/01/2018

MIT technique produces nanofibres with exceptional strength and resilience

Researchers at MIT have developed a process, called gel electrospinning, that can produce ultrafine fibres that are exceptionally strong and tough. These fibres, which should be inexpensive and easy to produce, could be used in applications such as armour and nanocomposites.  Read More

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