Carbon dioxide used to make plastic foam begins industrial production

Plastic giant Covestro has delivered its first batch of plastic raw material derived from CO2. The company has used the climate changing gas to produce a key building block in plastic known as polyol, which is in turn used to make a foam that is planned for use in mattresses and upholstered furniture.

The CO2 replaces a portion of petroleum in the foam and has moved beyond the lab and in to industrial production.

“We have reached another milestone,” said project manager Dr Karsten Malsch. “The plant is running smoothly, and the first shipment of our new flexible foam component made with CO2 is on its way to customers.”

Covestro aims to integrate ever more carbon dioxide into its products to supplement its reliance on petroleum based raw materials. The polyol is 20% CO2 with other projects confirming that 40% will soon be commercially possible.

Covestro is also striving to use carbon dioxide for the manufacture of other products besides flexible foam. Potential products that have already been tested in the lab include precursors for rigid foam and elastomers. The company is also willing to license the technology.

www.co2-dreams.covestro.com

Author
Justin Cunningham

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