Engineering Materials News

The latest news from the global materials community including material science, engineering, breakthroughs, innovation and applications.

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04/04/2018

Midas to display their large, low-volume polyurethane mouldings and prototypes at Engineering Materials Live

Midas specialises in producing large, low-volume polyurethane mouldings and prototypes - in production materials – fast, and they will be displaying several mouldings at the Engineering Materials Live exhibition on 10 May.  Read More

27/03/2018

James Dyson Awards begins the search for ingenious inventions

The James Dyson Award has opened for entries, giving students and recent graduates of engineering and design a unique opportunity to show their problem-solving inventions on a global stage. The brief is simple, design something which solves a problem, big or small. The winner will gain international exposure through the competition and £30,000 prize money to develop their idea.   Read More

26/03/2018

Military method slashes titanium production by 50%

Scientists at the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory’s (Dstl) Porton Down military research base have reduced the 40-stage titanium production process down to just two, which could cut costs in half.  Read More

23/03/2018

3D printed metallic glass alloys

North Carolina State University researchers have created amorphous metal, or metallic glass, alloys using 3D printing technology. This, the researchers say, opens the door to a variety of applications, such as more efficient electric motors, better wear-resistant materials, higher strength materials, and lighter weight structures.  Read More

20/03/2018

New exhibitors announced for Engineering Materials Live and FAST Live – 10 May

There have been several new additions to the high-quality exhibitor portfolio at the FAST Live and Engineering Materials Live event - all leading suppliers in the fastening, bonding and engineering materials sectors.  Read More

12/03/2018

Conductive coating could unlock future biometric and wearable technology

A team of researchers from the College of Engineering at Texas A&M University has developed a mechanically robust conductive coating that it claims can maintain performance under heavy stretching and bending.   Read More

12/03/2018

New ceramic coating enables wider adoption of composite materials

Zircotec Group has developed the first plasma applied thermal barrier coating that can be used with composites that require a Class A display surface. The new technology allows vehicle manufactures to use the lightweight materials in places that have previously not been possible, such as aerodynamic aids near exhaust pipes or the exhaust shrouds themselves.  Read More

27/02/2018

MIT technology produces electricity from temperature fluctuations

A team of researchers from MIT has come up with a novel way to convert temperature fluctuations into electrical power. Instead of requiring two different temperature inputs at the same time, this ‘thermal resonator’ system takes advantage of the swings in ambient temperature that occur during the day-night cycle.  Read More

30/01/2018

Alloy tested to create foldable wings for supersonic drone

NASA and Boeing have tested a drone that can hit incredible speeds due to a material innovation that allows the wings to dynamically change shape and position based on flight needs.  Read More

29/01/2018

Self-repairing ceramic for aircraft engines

Japanese researchers claim to have developed a ceramic material that self-repairs cracks in just one minute and could drastically change manufacturing methods for the transportation industry.  Read More

24/01/2018

Light-bending material could be used to create an invisibility cloak

Researchers from Northwestern University in Illinois have developed a first-of-its-kind technique for creating entirely new classes of optical materials and devices that could lead to light bending and cloaking devices.  Read More

16/01/2018

High-performance composites made via novel 3D printing technique

A team of researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) has demonstrated a novel 3D printing method that yields unprecedented control of the arrangement of short fibres embedded in polymer matrices. They used this additive manufacturing technique to program fibre orientation within epoxy composites in specified locations, enabling the creation of structural materials that are optimised for strength, stiffness, and damage tolerance.  Read More

11/01/2018

Research into self-regenerative materials

A consortium of seven universities, has received a grant of £2.7m to undertake ground-breaking research into manufacturing materials which have the ability to self-heal or regenerate.  Read More

10/01/2018

3D printed super soft structures to replicate internal organs

Imperial College London researchers have developed a new 3D printing technique using cryogenics that allows them to replicate 3D biological structures, which could be used for tissue regeneration and replica organs.  Read More

08/01/2018

MIT technique produces nanofibres with exceptional strength and resilience

Researchers at MIT have developed a process, called gel electrospinning, that can produce ultrafine fibres that are exceptionally strong and tough. These fibres, which should be inexpensive and easy to produce, could be used in applications such as armour and nanocomposites.  Read More

13/12/2017

CPI and Durham University collaborate to commercialise nanotechnology-enabled products

The Centre for Process Innovation (CPI) and Durham University are working together to help SMEs in County Durham to accelerate the commercialisation of nanomaterial-enhanced products, supported with funds from the European Regional Development Fund.   Read More

01/12/2017

Merging molecular science and engineering to make 3D printing better, cheaper

Researchers at Imperial College London are merging the fundamental research of molecular science with the more end-of-use-focussed discipline of engineering to help propel the 3D printing industry into its next stage of development.  Read More

27/11/2017

Graphene vibration could unlock clean, limitless energy

Research conducted by physicists at the University of Arkansas, has provided strong evidence that the motion of two-dimensional materials could be used as a source of clean, limitless energy. Paul Thibado, professor of physics at the University of Arkansas, and his students studied the movements of graphene.  Read More

22/11/2017

Melting hurts rather than helps sprayed metal coatings to stick

When bonding two pieces of metal, either the metals must melt where they meet or some molten metal must be introduced between the pieces. A solid bond then forms when the metal solidifies again. But researchers at MIT have found that in some situations, melting can actually inhibit metal bonding rather than promote it.  Read More

17/11/2017

Bonding composite to metal with no adhesives

Working on the Ariel Hipercar project, Powdertech Surface Science has developed a process, that uses no adhesives, for bonding polypropylene glass fibre composite to aluminium for the vehicle’s monocoque chassis.  Read More

15/11/2017

Helium-resistant material could enable stable nuclear fusion

Engineers and researchers from Texas A&M University and the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico have found a way to prevent helium, a by-product of the fusion reaction, from weakening nuclear fusion reactors.  Read More

06/11/2017

Tungsten to replace lead

EU Directive 2011/65/EU (RoHS 2) regulates the use of certain hazardous substances in electrical and electronic equipment, with lead ranked at the top of the list, higher than mercury and cadmium. It means lead is highly toxic and does not break down easily, which is why a weight proportion of only 0.1% is permitted in new electronic and electric equipment. It also has a melting point of 327°C, constituting an additional hazard in case of fire.   Read More

02/11/2017

Breakthrough for crack propagation in glass

Researchers have long pondered the origin of delicate crisscross faceted patterns that are commonly found on the surfaces of broken material. Typical crack speeds in glass easily surpass a kilometre per second, and broken surface features may be smaller than a millimetre. Since the formation of surface structure lasts a tiny fraction of a second, the processes generating these patterns have been largely a mystery.  Read More

30/10/2017

The Engineering Design Shows a big hit with visitors and exhibitors

The Engineering Design Shows 2017 drew to a close on Thursday 20th October with positive feedback from exhibitors and visitors.Running from 19 – 20 October at the Ricoh Arena, Coventry, the shows brought together more than 4000 design engineering professionals to the showcase of British design innovation.  Read More

25/10/2017

Concrete filled with irradiated plastic cuts carbon emissions

MIT researchers have added tiny plastic particulates to concrete and found the resulting compound is 20% stronger and requires less energy overall to produce, reducing carbon emissions. Plastic flakes were exposed to small, harmless doses of gamma radiation and then pulverised into flakes and made into a fine powder, which was then mixed with a cement paste.  Read More

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